Friday, 21 March 1997

NEW SKIRMISHES IN THE SKY DIRECT TO HOME – A TOUGH CLIMB AHEAD

Breakneck technological changes are threatening to make the already small global village into global ‘mohalla’. New discoveries are being made even before yesterday’s ‘latest’ discovery is yet to be implemented. Such is the case with the new-fangled DTH, which could be occluded by reportedly superior Ka-band. 
Meanwhile, the kneejerk reactions that our government is prone to making in face of advancing technology, seem to be replicating over the issue of DTH also and the final could well end up becoming very indirect. 

NEW SKIRMISHES IN THE SKY DIRECT TO HOME – A TOUGH CLIMB AHEAD

Breakneck technological changes are threatening to make the already small global village into global ‘mohalla’. New discoveries are being made even before yesterday’s ‘latest’ discovery is yet to be implemented. Such is the case with the new-fangled DTH, which could be occluded by reportedly superior Ka-band. 
Meanwhile, the kneejerk reactions that our government is prone to making in face of advancing technology, seem to be replicating over the issue of DTH also and the final could well end up becoming very indirect. 
Direct-To-Home (DTH) is a delivery system whereby digitally impressed channels can be sent through high-powered signals through Ku-band transponders directly to subscriber’s homes. The subscriber is in a position to access the channels if he is equipped with a small but powerful dish antenna and a decoder, which can unscramble the signals. DTH enables viewers to receive super quality picture and sound. 

Thursday, 20 March 1997

PROGRAMMING CHALLENGES

With an increasing number of channels available to Indian audience, the job of Channels managers to build, retain and increase its share of audience is becoming increasingly tougher. The proliferation of Channels -both audience-specific (Children Cartoon) and subject-specific (Sports, Movies) has meant the fragmentation of the already fragmented audience, this makes the task of how-to-get audience, particularly difficult one for television institutions. Because it is a mass audience, the audience tastes are so diffused and so general that you have got to be guessing. You can work off precedents about what’s worked on television before. You can work off whatever smattering sociological information you gleaned from whatever sources. You can let your personal judgments enter into it to some extent - But you never really know. There is no wav to know in advance whether the audience will tune in and stay tuned. The only option available to Channel Managers is to devise risk-reducing strategies. One such strategy is to customise.

PROGRAMMING CHALLENGES

With an increasing number of channels available to Indian audience, the job of Channels managers to build, retain and increase its share of audience is becoming increasingly tougher. The proliferation of Channels -both audience-specific (Children Cartoon) and subject-specific (Sports, Movies) has meant the fragmentation of the already fragmented audience, this makes the task of how-to-get audience, particularly difficult one for television institutions. Because it is a mass audience, the audience tastes are so diffused and so general that you have got to be guessing. You can work off precedents about what’s worked on television before. You can work off whatever smattering sociological information you gleaned from whatever sources. You can let your personal judgments enter into it to some extent - But you never really know. There is no wav to know in advance whether the audience will tune in and stay tuned. The only option available to Channel Managers is to devise risk-reducing strategies. One such strategy is to customise.

PROGRAMMING CHALLENGES

With an increasing number of channels available to Indian audience, the job of Channels managers to build, retain and increase its share of audience is becoming increasingly tougher. The proliferation of Channels -both audience-specific (Children Cartoon) and subject-specific (Sports, Movies) has meant the fragmentation of the already fragmented audience, this makes the task of how-to-get audience, particularly difficult one for television institutions. Because it is a mass audience, the audience tastes are so diffused and so general that you have got to be guessing. You can work off precedents about what’s worked on television before. You can work off whatever smattering sociological information you gleaned from whatever sources. You can let your personal judgments enter into it to some extent - But you never really know. There is no wav to know in advance whether the audience will tune in and stay tuned. The only option available to Channel Managers is to devise risk-reducing strategies. One such strategy is to customise.

Friday, 14 March 1997

Technology Advance in Post-Production & Broadcast

Abstract
This article will discuss the recent technology advances in the areas of compression, disk technologies and associated RAID technologies, editing systems and the impact on the post-production and broadcast markets. It will also dwell on the shifts being seen in the video industry from analog to digital, from analog tape to digital tape, from tape to disk and digital tape formats. Recent advances in the areas of compression, with special emphasis on the brand new MPEG2 professional 4:2:2 profile, and its impact to the news, broadcast, archival and the post-production markets will be discussed. As more and more computer systems are being used in the video industry, the challenge to transport this video information faster (than real time) from one system to another becomes apparent. The various network topologies and technologies such as ATM, FDDI,Fibre Channel, SDH etc., will be positioned.

Technology Advance in Post-Production & Broadcast

Abstract
This article will discuss the recent technology advances in the areas of compression, disk technologies and associated RAID technologies, editing systems and the impact on the post-production and broadcast markets. It will also dwell on the shifts being seen in the video industry from analog to digital, from analog tape to digital tape, from tape to disk and digital tape formats. Recent advances in the areas of compression, with special emphasis on the brand new MPEG2 professional 4:2:2 profile, and its impact to the news, broadcast, archival and the post-production markets will be discussed. As more and more computer systems are being used in the video industry, the challenge to transport this video information faster (than real time) from one system to another becomes apparent. The various network topologies and technologies such as ATM, FDDI,Fibre Channel, SDH etc., will be positioned.

Thursday, 13 March 1997

PROPOSED BROADCAST BILL

Addressing a delegation of the Cable Operators Federation of India led by Mrs. Roop Sharma on Feb. 13, 1997, the Union 1 & B Minister Mr. C.M. Ibrahim declared that “ The Broadcast Bill will play an important role in regulating the industry by minimising if not eliminating confusion and chaos caused by unregulated growth”. He however agreed with COFI’s demand that “Cable Operators should be heard and consulted prior to the formulation of the proposed legislation.” The meeting was also attended by Mr. N.P. Nawani I & B Secretary and Mr. K.S. Sarma, Director General, Doordarshan.

Tuesday, 11 March 1997

PROPOSED BROADCAST BILL

Addressing a delegation of the Cable Operators Federation of India led by Mrs. Roop Sharma on Feb. 13, 1997, the Union 1 & B Minister Mr. C.M. Ibrahim declared that “ The Broadcast Bill will play an important role in regulating the industry by minimising if not eliminating confusion and chaos caused by unregulated growth”. He however agreed with COFI’s demand that “Cable Operators should be heard and consulted prior to the formulation of the proposed legislation.” The meeting was also attended by Mr. N.P. Nawani I & B Secretary and Mr. K.S. Sarma, Director General, Doordarshan.
In this age of information explosion, one aspect that is being debated most hotly is the imminent presentation of the proposed Indian Broadcasting Bill before the Indian Parliament during its ongoing budget session. The public opinion in the country is sharply divided over the issue. While one segment is vehemently against any sort of concessions to foreign broadcasters, there is another that favours their presence citing freedom of expression enshrined under article 19(2) of the Indian constitution in support of their arguments.