Monday, 21 July 1997

Regulation: The Necessity

A country’s regulatory philosophy is built on its own unique history and traditions. In India so far we had the experience of state monopoly in the infrastructure development. After 50 years of independence, we are fast moving towards privatisation. However, we have to tread our path very carefully so as not to go off the track in a haste. On the other hand we have to counter the political lethargy in the country. There is a tendency to slow down the matter if there are no personal gains to be made. 
It is unfortunate that the faster we try to develop, the more we get into scams. The best approach is the natural approach that lets the market forces and technology create the right environment for development. Regulations are needed only to compliment tins development. Regulatory structure for broadcasting should include national and state level bodies. National level Authority should handle subjects like frequency spectrum distribution, programming codes, tech-meal standards and guide the state authorities in national policy implementation and subjects like taxation and technical standards. The state level authorities should deal with implementation of various policies in the best interests of the nation and the industry. Implementation should be decentralised to the greatest extent. In a true democracy the general approach to regulating the broadcast and Even if Regulations are essential, it is advisable to form them after due deliberation and considering all aspects for the growth of the industry rather than hurrying them through the Parliament to create history communication industry is

Do We Need BAI at All

Convergence of Telecom Broadcasting and Multitimedia may make the BAI redundant very soon
The Broadcasting Bill 1997 was tabled in the Lok ‘Sabha on 16th May 1997 by S. Jaipal Reddy, Minister to Information and Broadcasting. 

Regulation: The Necessity

A country’s regulatory philosophy is built on its own unique history and traditions. In India so far we had the experience of state monopoly in the infrastructure development. After 50 years of independence, we are fast moving towards privatisation. However, we have to tread our path very carefully so as not to go off the track in a haste. On the other hand we have to counter the political lethargy in the country. There is a tendency to slow down the matter if there are no personal gains to be made. 

Do We Need BAI at All

Convergence of Telecom Broadcasting and Multitimedia may make the BAI redundant very soon
The Broadcasting Bill 1997 was tabled in the Lok ‘Sabha on 16th May 1997 by S. Jaipal Reddy, Minister to Information and Broadcasting. 

Sunday, 13 July 1997

Broadcasting Authority of India

In response to the Supreme directive in the Union of into versus the Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB) case in February 1995 in which airwaves were declared public property and were to be regulated by an independent authority with statutory status; which ultimately prevents monopolies and protects viewers to access a range of services programmes and views, enough emphasis has been given to codify the BAI in the Broadcast To pioneer the cause of listener and viewers against the authority of the broadcasters-be of public or private; the BAI is being constituted.

The Broadcast Bill

It’s impact on and apprehensions of Individual Cable Operators Inderjit Singh The Cabla TV Scenario In India
Cable TV existed in India since nineteen eighties in the form of a single in house video channel in some cities in the West and South. A sudden spurt in spreading of networks came with ( the invasion of Kuwait, when the gulf war was shown live through satellite by CNN in Jan. 1991. At the same time the film distributors started selling Cable TV lights of films on exclusive area basis and created a gold rush of sorts. 

Cross-Media Restrictions, Foreign Investments & Other Licencing Issues

Apprehending the genuineness of print media barons extending their empire in the field of broadcasting too, the Bill restricts cross media holdings. That is to say, those having a say in print media are denied the provisions of having the same say in broadcast media. 
On this issue the Bill lacks clarity of meaning and generates enough hue and cry. Because it will have in its stride a few Indian Industrialists too. Mr. K.K. Birla, an upper house member of Parliament, who happens to be the Chairman of The Hindustan Times group, is unlikely to remain silent. Mr. Birla is a member of the Joint Parliamentary Select Committee. Since his empire extends to Home TV with a 30% stake, it might instigate him to come out of his profile of a gentleman parliamentarian. Then there are others too. 

Cross-Media Restrictions, Foreign Investments & Other Licencing Issues

Apprehending the genuineness of print media barons extending their empire in the field of broadcasting too, the Bill restricts cross media holdings. That is to say, those having a say in print media are denied the provisions of having the same say in broadcast media. 
On this issue the Bill lacks clarity of meaning and generates enough hue and cry. Because it will have in its stride a few Indian Industrialists too. Mr. K.K. Birla, an upper house member of Parliament, who happens to be the Chairman of The Hindustan Times group, is unlikely to remain silent. Mr. Birla is a member of the Joint Parliamentary Select Committee. Since his empire extends to Home TV with a 30% stake, it might instigate him to come out of his profile of a gentleman parliamentarian. Then there are others too. 

Cross-Media Restrictions, Foreign Investments & Other Licencing Issues

Apprehending the genuineness of print media barons extending their empire in the field of broadcasting too, the Bill restricts cross media holdings. That is to say, those having a say in print media are denied the provisions of having the same say in broadcast media. 
On this issue the Bill lacks clarity of meaning and generates enough hue and cry. Because it will have in its stride a few Indian Industrialists too. Mr. K.K. Birla, an upper house member of Parliament, who happens to be the Chairman of The Hindustan Times group, is unlikely to remain silent. Mr. Birla is a member of the Joint Parliamentary Select Committee. Since his empire extends to Home TV with a 30% stake, it might instigate him to come out of his profile of a gentleman parliamentarian. Then there are others too. 

The Broadcast Bill

It’s impact on and apprehensions of Individual Cable Operators
Inderjit Singh
The Cabla TV Scenario In India
Cable TV existed in India since nineteen eighties in the form of a single in house video channel in some cities in the West and South. A sudden spurt in spreading of networks came with ( the invasion of Kuwait, when the gulf war was shown live through satellite by CNN in Jan. 1991. At the same time the film distributors started selling Cable TV lights of films on exclusive area basis and created a gold rush of sorts. 
A broad spectrum of mostly young and adventurous entrepreneurs entered the field. Cable TV networks were erected on first come first serve basis and the area became the jurisdiction of the operator. It was a leap in the dark. Lack of know-how, poor technology level in the country and the issue of film rights became a pandora’s box for the operator specially when competition resulted. Spurious products were sold to him by new manufacturers of co-axial cable and equipment, which did not deliver the promised results and prices charged were exorbitant. 

Broadcasting Authority of India

In response to the Supreme directive in the Union of into versus the Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB) case in February 1995 in which airwaves were declared public property and were to be regulated by an independent authority with statutory status; which ultimately prevents monopolies and protects viewers to access a range of services programmes and views, enough emphasis has been given to codify the BAI in the Broadcast To pioneer the cause of listener and viewers against the authority of the broadcasters-be of public or private; the BAI is being constituted.
As per the seventh schedule of constitution broadcasting is a central subject. Hence it is obligatory the centre to formulate its aces and investigate its pries. Cable Television Network illation) ordinance, 1994 and the Prasar Bharti Act are the subjects governed by Ministry of Information and Broadcasting until now. These provisions serve very little impetus to the vast horizon of pursuits. The management of Radio Frequency Spectrum is dealt by Wireless and Planning Coordination of the Ministry of Communication. The sanctions of these authorities is too little to cast even a shadow of their own.